trauma after medical events

Recently I picked up a couple of Diane Ackerman's books.  First  was: One Hundred Words for Love which is about her encounter with the potential and real devastation of strokes. In this case, it was her husband who had the stroke and what struck me was the obvious psychological trauma; hers and her husbands.  Trauma causing medical events is not a new subject for this site but I couldn't resist  reviewing the book here because it is so touching, real and grounded in solid understanding both psychologically (her own)  and of the literal brain. Ackerman had a deep understanding about  brain function from researching and writing an earlier book: An Alchemy of Mind.  Being a brain function freak, I began my reading with An Alchemy of Mind -- a lyrical treatment of often dry research, her book is rich and rife with metaphor.  For me, as both a poet and a traumatologist,  it was a much needed break into the poetic world. I recommend going along with Diane Ackerman on her exploration. 

Probiotics for depression?

Depression and gut bacteria.  Hmmm. Connection?  Yes.  This and much more in Scientific American Brain: http://www.scientificamerican.com/article.cfm?id=the-neuroscience-of-gut...

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Post Traumatic Stress Injury and Unnecessary Suicide

While I was frying potatoes for dinner the other night,  there was a report on the news that a well known Iraqi vet had killed himself.  This was a man who for years had helped so many of his buddies manage symptoms of PTSD while suffering himself. The operative word here is “manage” symptoms. Methods that cure or relieve symptoms of PTSD are not yet highly known and yet are short term and easily applied by a trained lay person. Without this knowledge, what is left is managing symptoms.

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Who We Are

Where the personal story can be safely explored and expressed.

                  

Ashlar Center for Narrative Arts is an arts driven non-profit educational organization that serves the Personal Story.

We are Peace Builders working with the individual and community.

We come to our clients by invitation and with them develop culturally relevant programs.

The goal is resiliency and capacity building.

We use spoken word, writing, arts processes and music to extend  language, to give shape, form and voice to the unspoken and make coherent the life story.  

Our goal is to empower people through their own personal work with story to work in community.

Our goal is to extend understanding toward respecting and appreciating cultural difference. 

Our desire is to nurture relationship, encourage learning and teaching through community involvement.  

We provide lay people the means to become Narrative Arts Facilitators so they can better serve community. 

While our work is highly therapeutic it is not psychotherapy.  Our processes lie closer to anthropology, and spirituality with its mythological underpinnings.

Students who dive deeply into the depths of the personal story, emerge in the human story that belongs to all of us. 

We invite you to invite us.